Ethical dilemma: What would you do?

You are part of the planning committee for your upcoming district conference with both in-person and virtual participation options. Part of your committee’s job is to decide how to involve Rotaract members during the event. One committee member suggests that Rotaract members manage the Zoom registration and technical support for the virtual participants to leverage their technology skills. Another member mentions that there could be more meaningful ways to engage Rotaract members in your conference. What would you do?

Every month, Rotary magazine showcases answers to an ethical question that members might face in their Rotary or Rotaract clubs. Share your suggestions below to be included in a future issue.


6 thoughts on “Ethical dilemma: What would you do?

    1. At the very least I would ask the Rotaractors what they want to do. But if you are serious about involving them I would ask them to join the planning committee

  1. Contact them, ask one or two to join the planning committee, share with them the role/duties needs, and ask them to select what they would feel best equipped to do.

  2. Clearly this is a demeaning request to Rotaracters unless linked to a larger role in the conference. Why deprive the Rotarians of the insights of Rotaracters in conference breakouts and plenary sessions. My last several conferences, I learned from them more consistently than from Rotarians. Also, if you do ask their help with registration, let them share the job with Rotarians, so that the Rotarians can learn from them.

  3. Asking Rotaractors to be in charge of Zoom and other technical aspects is a great idea, however it is a “behind the scenes” function. Why not invite them to act as MC’s? Better yet, iclude them in the organizing committee, ask them for suggestions for their participation.

  4. I would
    1. Reach out to Rotaract and ask them to be involved in the committee

    2. Maybe partner Rotaract with other Rotarians to help with all acpects of the Committee, that will foster inclusion.

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